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Saturday, October 16, 2021

The Fat Pig, Hong Kong

Michaelis Boyd Associates has completed another project for Tom Aiken’s, this time The Fat Pig, Hong Kong.

 

Michaelis Boyd translated Aiken’s casual and contemporary nose-to-tail dining concept through their use of raw materials and open plan design. Taking inspiration from local culture, the restaurant has been created to celebrate the conviviality of Chinese family dining. Referencing the city itself, it features eye-catching neon details inspired by the rich history of Hong Kong’s disappearing iconic street signage.

The large 6350 sq ft space has been divided into three distinct areas; a microbrewery and beer hall, bar area and main dining room. Set off with engrained oak flooring and natural oak furniture, the microbrewery takes inspiration from the traditional beer hall, creating a striking and inviting entrance area. The warm neon signage sets the tone and creates an eye-catching anteroom to the restaurant beyond.

 

The bar is created from cast pigmented concrete, with a custom made glazed lava stone bar top. The bar focuses back on the restaurant with the use of subtly branded mirrors, and custom made brasserie style lights. Around the bar, soft leather dining banquettes in deep red, sage and forest green are arranged.

 

The bespoke lighting and furniture made especially for the restaurant has been realised in a palette of materials including brass, oak, marble and custom blown glass. The warm ambiance created by the gloss emerald ceiling and glazed lava stone bar top is complemented by the deep blues used elsewhere in the joinery and bar paneling in the restaurant. The glazed tiles in the same palette help to magnify the impact of the various neon works.

 

The dining room has been designed as a permeable part of the overall scheme, allowing diners glimpses and views of the whole space, the with dramatic open kitchen as a focal point. Mirrors and tiling surround the main dining room creating a dramatic environment and a range of seating areas provide a variety of dining experiences, whether more intimate of for larger family-style meals.

 

http://michaelisboyd.com/

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